archives.commons.udmercy.edu

The Age of Inquiry

In March, 1827, Freedom’s Journal, the first black-owned and operated newspaper was established with the goal of reaching the free black population in the northeastern part of the U.S.  A speech (delivered in July, 1830) by one of its founders, Peter Williams, is among some of the earliest speeches held in the Black Abolitionist archive. Soon, other black-owned newspapers followed.  Among these was Frederick Douglass’ Paper (which had evolved from his previous newspapers), and among the editors of this paper was teacher, writer,...

botw.commons.udmercy.edu

We Shall Not Be Moved/No nos moveran: Biography of a Song of Struggle (EBOOK)

by David Spener The activist anthem “We Shall Not Be Moved” expresses resolve in the face of adversity; it helps members of social movements persevere in their struggles to build a better world. The exact origins of the song are unknown, but it appears to have begun as a Protestant revival song sung by rural whites and African slaves in the southeastern United States in the early nineteenth century. The song was subsequently adopted by U.S. labor and civil rights...

Contested Illnesses: Citizens, Science, and Health Social Movements

by Phil Brown (Editor), Rachel Morello-Frosch (Editor), Stephen Zavestoski (Editor) The politics and science of health and disease remain contested terrain among scientists, health practitioners, policy makers, industry, communities, and the public. Stakeholders in disputes about illnesses or conditions disagree over their fundamental causes as well as how they should be treated and prevented. This thought-provoking book crosses disciplinary boundaries by engaging with both public health policy and social science, asserting that science, activism, and policy are not separate issues...

Mothers Unite! : Organizing for Workplace Flexibility and the Transformation of Family Life (EBOOK)

by Jocelyn Elise Crowley In Mothers Unite!, a bold and hopeful new rallying cry for changing the relationship between home and the workplace, Jocelyn Elise Crowley envisions a genuine, universal world of workplace flexibility that helps mothers who stay at home, those who work part time, and those who work full time balance their commitments to their jobs and their families. Achieving this goal, she argues, will require a broad-based movement that harnesses the energy of existing organizations of mothers...

ids.commons.udmercy.edu

Adding SCORM quizzes to Camtasia lectures

Did you know you can add quizzes to your Camtasia Studio recordings? When using the SCORM format for uploading your presentation to Blackboard, students’ results will even be added to the Grade Center automatically. You can choose to also receive the results via email in case you want to collect results outside of a Blackboard course. To get started, open an existing Camtasia Studio project (.camproj) or create a new project by opening a Camtasia Recording file (.trec). Opening the...

Using My Groups for Students

The Groups feature provides students with an easy way to collaborate online, share notes, and submit group assignments. Groups can be self-enrolled, or manually-enrolled (instructor-assigned.) Enrolling in a Group To enroll in a group, click on Tools in the left-side content menu, then on the Groups item. If there is a sign-up sheet for a self-enrolled group you will see a button to view the sign-up sheet. After clicking the Sign-up Sheet button, you will be able to choose a...

Taking a test in Lockdown Browser

What is it? Respondus LockDown Browser provides a more secure environment for online testing. LockDown Browser itself is a separate web browser (like Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome) specifically geared toward taking online tests. When a student is ready to take an online test that uses LockDown Browser, they actually launch the LockDown Browser from their desktop instead of launching their usual browser of choice. LockDown Browser then fills the student’s screen (including any additional displays), open to Detroit Mercy’s...

research.commons.udmercy.edu

In Memory of Derick Nelson

Normally, the Research Blog describes library resources that might be useful to students and faculty. However, today we are departing from that mission to recognize Betty Nelson’s son Derick who was killed two years ago today. Today’s blog is a reprise of a blog posted that summer.   It happens everyday. Everyday you watch the news and there is another story about a senseless shooting in some part of Detroit. If you pay any attention at all, it’s only to...

The Library Has What You Need for Finals!

We know you’re getting geared up for the toughest time of the term- FINALS! Don’t panic. We have you covered. The McNichols Campus Library is open extended hours through finals week. Remember to have your Student ID with you. April 17 – 29 Monday, April 17 – Thursday, April 20  8:00am – midnight Friday, April 21  8:00am – 5:30pm Saturday, April 22 9:00am – 5:00pm Sunday, April 23 12:30pm – midnight Monday, April 24 – Thursday, April 27  8:00am –...

Ta-Nehisi Coates – Between the World and Me

Ta-Nehisi Coates will be delivering the keynote presentation, “Between the World and Me” at 6:30 pm on April 4th, at Calihan Hall. Don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to be in the presence of, and listen to one of the most thoughtful and challenging voices speaking and writing today. In a recent piece in The Atlantic Tressie McMillan Cottom writes, “in The Atlantic, Coates is a cross between a public historian and a public sociologist.” Ta-Nehisi Coates is a...

libnews.commons.udmercy.edu

Need a Place to Study?

Room 324 in the McNichols Campus Library can be reserved by your group of at least three people for a two-hour time slot during dead week and finals week. Sign up in person at the Research Desk. Two other study rooms are available, first come first served, one on the first floor and one on the lower level for groups of two or more....

special-collections.commons.udmercy.edu

Colonization

Colonization is the process by which one power dominates another. This can be the way a more powerful country takes control of another, but it’s also the way one culture seeks to control another by usurping the established cultural civilization of another. This has happened time and again since human beings migrated out of Africa — as they defeated tribes and gained territories, as they morphed languages and destroyed religions, they also changed their own culture. Societies have evolved by snuffing out the weaker cultures, and taking control of their languages, their rituals, the details of their social structures that made the conquered culture unique....

Travelogue 1863

During the years of African-American Newspaper publication in the 1800s, articles would often appear regarding travel across the new territory that was opening up in the western part of the country thanks to the discovery of gold in 1848.  It seemed everyone was anxious to take advantage of free land and wide open spaces. When reporter George W. Turley made his way west in 1863, the Homestead Act offering free land to anyone who would agree to farm the land...

“A Boy of 1812″

Things were never really what you might call cordial between the New World and Britain during the early 1800s. There was the whole mess between the United Kingdom, Ireland, and France in 1803. And European countries were focused on keeping control of the native people as well as the America settlers as the expansion in the United States was underway. Treaties and Acts and Decrees were issued one after another between Britain and the U.S., while Britain was during these years distracted by the whirlwind of hostility France was dishing out. In fact, between 1803 and 1812, political relations never really felt settled or peaceful between the U.S., Britain, and France to the people living in these countries....