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Take Up Your Pen: Unilateral Presidential Directives in American Politics (EBOOK)

by Graham G. Dodds Executive orders and proclamations afford presidents an independent means of controlling a wide range of activities in the federal government—yet they are not mentioned in the U.S. Constitution. In fact, the controversial edicts known as universal presidential directives seem to violate the separation of powers by enabling the commander-in-chief to bypass Congress and enact his own policy preferences. As Clinton White House counsel Paul Begala remarked on the numerous executive orders signed by the president during...

Unruly Equality: U.S. Anarchism in the Twentieth Century (EBOOK)

by Andrew Cornell The first intellectual and social history of American anarchist thought and activism across the twentieth century In this highly accessible history of anarchism in the United States, Andrew Cornell reveals an astounding continuity and development across the century. Far from fading away, anarchists dealt with major events such as the rise of Communism, the New Deal, atomic warfare, the black freedom struggle, and a succession of artistic avant-gardes stretching from 1915 to 1975. Unruly Equality traces U.S....

African Philosophy and Thought Systems. A Search for a Culture and Philosophy of Belonging

by Munyaradzi Mawere The once acrimonious debate on the existence of African philosophy has come of age, yet the need to cultivate a culture of belonging is more demanding now than ever before in many African societies. The gargantuan indelible energised chicanery waves of neo-colonialism and globalisation and their sweeping effect on Africa demand more concerted action and solutions than cul-de-sac discourses and magical realism. It is in view of this realisation that this book was born. This is a...

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Education – 1851

History has a way of collapsing time.  It moves along a social timeline from major event to major event and the small steps that occurred to the human beings involved in the day to day struggle between those events are often overlooked.  We see for example the settling of Jamestown, Virginia in 1619 (and the African slaves who were included in this), the Civil War in 1861, and the emancipation of slaves in 1863. We’re told that slavery had a...

“Southside View of Slavery”

A documentary on Public Television (PBS) called The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross offers an excellent overview of slavery in the United States from its early beginnings in the 1500s to its final end in 1865.  This view aligns closely with the history recorded in the Black Abolitionist Archive’s editorials and speeches.  Slavery wasn’t anything new when this country was first established.  What WAS new, however, was the notion of “who” slaves were and how this tied in with...

Love and Freedom

Love and Freedom This month we celebrate two of the most valued aspects of human existence: love and freedom.  Valentine’s Day (observed in remembrance of St. Valentine) focuses our collective attention on romantic love.  We traditionally celebrate this holiday on February 14, by offering those dearest to us acts of love and devotion usually in the form of something sweet and beautiful: candy, flowers, poetry, sentimental cards, etc. February is also Black History Month.  This month is filled with events...

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The Library Has What You Need for Finals!

We know you’re getting geared up for the toughest time of the term- FINALS! Don’t panic. We have you covered. The McNichols Campus Library is open extended hours through finals week. Remember to have your Student ID with you. December 4 – 17 Sunday, December 4 12:30pm – midnight  Monday, December 5 – Thursday, December 8  8:00am – midnight Friday, December 9  8:00am – 5:30pm Saturday, December 10 9:00am – 5:00pm Sunday, December 11 12:30pm – midnight Monday, December 12...

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Colonization

Colonization is the process by which one power dominates another. This can be the way a more powerful country takes control of another, but it’s also the way one culture seeks to control another by usurping the established cultural civilization of another. This has happened time and again since human beings migrated out of Africa — as they defeated tribes and gained territories, as they morphed languages and destroyed religions, they also changed their own culture. Societies have evolved by snuffing out the weaker cultures, and taking control of their languages, their rituals, the details of their social structures that made the conquered culture unique....

Travelogue 1863

During the years of African-American Newspaper publication in the 1800s, articles would often appear regarding travel across the new territory that was opening up in the western part of the country thanks to the discovery of gold in 1848.  It seemed everyone was anxious to take advantage of free land and wide open spaces. When reporter George W. Turley made his way west in 1863, the Homestead Act offering free land to anyone who would agree to farm the land...

“A Boy of 1812″

Things were never really what you might call cordial between the New World and Britain during the early 1800s. There was the whole mess between the United Kingdom, Ireland, and France in 1803. And European countries were focused on keeping control of the native people as well as the America settlers as the expansion in the United States was underway. Treaties and Acts and Decrees were issued one after another between Britain and the U.S., while Britain was during these years distracted by the whirlwind of hostility France was dishing out. In fact, between 1803 and 1812, political relations never really felt settled or peaceful between the U.S., Britain, and France to the people living in these countries....

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Need a Place to Study?

Room 324 in the McNichols Campus Library can be reserved by your group of at least three people for a two-hour time slot during dead week and finals week. Sign up in person at the Research Desk. Two other study rooms are available, first come first served, one on the first floor and one on the lower level for groups of two or more....

Constitution Day

This year Constitution Day is celebrated on September 17, commemorating the signing in the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787. To celebrate this day, the National Archives have a number of activities to help teachers and students explore the Constitution. Teachers in particular may also be interested in the Library of Congress Constitution Day Resources page, with contains a number of educational activities, as well as links to primary resources. The Constitution Center will be broadcasting some of their most...